On the Ground

On the Ground: Gary Peare

JHUI Level 3 Certified Teacher Gary Peare shares some quick insights into what’s working in his teaching programs

JHUI Level 3 Teacher Gary Peare

JHUI Level 3 Teacher Gary Peare

I’ve been teaching a combination of private lessons and adult group classes at Lamorinda Music in Lafayette, California since 2009. Before JHUI, I was primarily a self-taught player, and taught a standard “paint-by-numbers,” chording and strumming method.

Since then, I’ve come to realize that nearly everything that advanced students want to learn—chord solos, fingerpicking, and especially playing ensemble arrangements—all requires basic music literacy and an understanding of the fingerboard. The challenge is, how do you convince intermediate players to go back to square one and learn to read music? Especially when you’ve gotten them this far with the old follow-the-diagrams method!

A favorite technique I gleaned from JHUI is the concept of Stealth Teaching. I love to trick intermediate students into pressing the reset button by introducing them to the world of canons. I start out with Russian Lullaby. Can’t read it? Easy, it’s just the C scale. Don’t know the C scale? Let me show you. And off you go. Note reading, keeping time, ensemble playing, basic harmony—it’s all in there. 

Here are some lesson plan ideas that have worked for me. Sit in a circle, assigning parts by first pairing up students next to one another, then by skipping one, then with a player opposite them in the circle. You’ll be surprised at how dramatically the performance improves when students start listening to one another. Final tip: be sure to memorize the entire canon so you can direct and jump in as needed.


The New Ukulele Program Starter Kit

starter-kit.png

• The C-Chord Trap (And How to Avoid It)
• Detailed Sample lesson plan
• Top 10 Reasons to Choose Ukulele
• Parent letter template
• Two fun Songs to teach Right Away
• Easy Pickin’s: Melody for Beginners
• Words of wisdom from ukulele teachers around the world

and much more!

It’s the new Ukulele Yes!

Welcome!

.

.

It’s the next phase of Ukulele Yes! We felt it was time to bring back this great resource but make it more manageable and useful for people in the current online environment. So, we’ve made it a blog! When you subscribe to Ukulele Yes!, you’ll receive an email from us when new posts are published, which will be about once a month so they won’t clutter up your Inbox!

Posts will be helpful and inspiring teaching stories, tools and tips that are working for teachers just like you around the world.

In addition, the Ukulele Yes! Archive is still around so you can search out all of those fantastic articles from past issues and previous iterations. There are loads of really useful teaching resources in there from over the years so make sure you check it out.

Thanks for signing up here and let’s keep spreading the goodness of music through our favourite little instrument.

Uke on!

James